Name Name

title
descript
Username:
Password: *
Remember me
* Forgot your password? Click Here
  • slideshow_large
  • In the wake of one of the worst natural disasters in American history, it's time to face the reality of climate change

    Every four years presidential candidates tell the American people that that election is a turning point for the country. This year they might have actually been right. To be sure, there are always differences between candidates. On a range of issues, from health care to tax reform, voters this year faced a real choice about two different approaches to governing. But the other turning point in this election, which has a very real impact on the future of this country, was the bipartisan silence, during almost all of the campaign, on one of the most critical issues of our time. By this I refer to the silence around climate change.

    For the first time in 24 years, the words "climate" and "warming" were not used once in the presidential debate, while "oil" and "natural gas" were mentioned 56 times. To put that in context, the U.S. just experienced the warmest eight months on record, during which time over 60 percent of the nation experienced moderate-to-exceptional drought conditions, 44,000 wild fires burned 7.7 million acres, and U.S. corn production reached its lowest yield in 17 years. In 2011, the 14 most severe weather events in the country cost the U.S. close to $140 billion. I write this in the midst of Hurricane Sandy, which is on track to be the largest storm ever to hit the east coast.

    The nation is haltingly moving from one disaster to the next while the candidates bickered about who can drill for more oil and gas. To ignore the problem of greenhouse gas emissions while millions of Americans are suffering as a result is either denial to the extreme or the peak of negligence.

    Now, before people jump to conclusions, let's clear up one misconception right away. Averting the worst consequences of global climate change is not about protecting the planet. It is about protecting us. As the extreme weather events of the last decade have shown us time and time again, the planet is quite capable of protecting itself.  Eons ago, Earth existed and even prospered under conditions that would be uninhabitable to mankind and most other forms of life today. The heat waves, flooding, wild fires and gale force winds that we now experience with increasing frequency and intensity are all a part of the Earth's adaptive capacity to adjust to a changing climate.

    Read the rest at Huffington Post

    Photo: A truck drives through water pushed over a road by Hurricane Sandy in Southampton, New York, on October 29, 2012. (Lucas Jackson / Reuters)

    SHARE

    READ

    LATEST
    Page
    1

    Conceptual Photos of Bolivia by Scarlett Hooft Graafland

    Dutch artist combines photography and installation on the Bolivian salt flats more

    El Nino may not be able to save California

    The Golden State issues statewide water restrictions as it prepares for the worst drought in its history more

    French Photographer's Intimate Photos in a Fisherman Hut in the Country

    Maud Chalard captures private scenes with her sister more

    Chilean Beach House

    Nestled in nature more

    Australian Winemakers Respond to Changing Climate

    As the country's traditional wine-growing regions grow hotter and drier, winemakers are flocking to Tasmania more

    Celebrating Summer Squash and Zucchini in Season

    David Tanis doles out his favorite recipe for The New York Times more

    The photography of Benjamin Heath

    Beautiful man/woman in nature compositions more

    The Wilderness Act's Midlife Crisis

    As we approach the legislation's 50th birthday, it's time to rethink the wild more

    Landscape Light Installations by Barry Underwood

    Surreal long exposure shots offer subtle comment on light pollution more

    California's Climate Revolution

    Could it change the national conversation? more

    Evocative Landscape Paintings by Thomas Lamb

    Immersive landscape works inspired by travel more

    Want Safer and Cheaper Solar Panels? Just Add Salt

    Researchers switch out a toxic chemical in solar cells for a salt found in tofu more

    Global Warming is Going to Be Financially Hard-Hitting

    Bipartisan Report Tallies High Toll on Global Economy from Global Warming more

    Zack Seckler's Botswana

    Brooklyn photographer captures landscape from above more

    I'll Have the Biodynamic Red

    It's time to get in touch with your inner hippie more
    Page
    1