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Backyard Aquaponics

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NYT article covers the growing trend in the hyroponics meets aquaculture method of sustainable agriculture.

A form of year-round, sustainable agriculture called aquaponics — a combination of hydroponics (or water-based planting) and aquaculture (fish cultivation) — has recently attracted a zealous following of kitchen gardeners, futurists, tinkerers and practical environmentalists. It is either a glimpse into the future of food growing or a very strange hobby — possibly both...MORE -Michael......read more

SHFT Sampler 2-25-11

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Amazon deforestation rising, Costco improves seafood policy, Nutmobile goes green, and more.

Falling Up: Almost a year ago, we happily reported that global deforestation rates were falling sharply, thanks in large part to less logging in the Amazon. But newly released study, is turning our upside-down frowns back around again. The figures in the report say that Amazon deforestation rates are up 1000% from last year. Dirty Air Act: Faced with stiff pressure from Congressional......read more

Farming Fish Sustainably at Skuna Bay Salmon

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Vancouver Island fish farm produces "craft-raised" salmon

As food issues go, they don't come more divisive than fish farming. Even within the environmentalist community, there are people on both sides of the argument. Advocates argue that aquaculture reduces stress on wild seafood stocks, while opponents point to viruses and sea lice that spread from farms to wild fish.  Nowhere is this fish farm debate more lively than on British Columbia's west......read more

The Farmer and The Bluefin

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The Perennial Plate takes a looks at the controversial practice of tuna farming

Driven by demand in Japan's seafood market, stocks of the bluefin tuna have depleted 85 percent over the last forty-odd years. Can aquaculture help meet the demand and save the threatened species? In "The Farmer and the Bluefin," The Perennial Plate hones its cameras in on a bluefin tuna farm in Wakayama, Japan. Whereas most bluefin farming operations capture young fish......read more

Farming the Bluefin

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Can aquaculture help save the world’s largest tuna?

The giant Atlantic bluefin tuna is one of the fastest fish in the sea. A fierce predator, it hunts incessantly and can cross the ocean multiple times in its life. Now, European researchers are looking to convert this very wild — and very threatened — species into a farm animal. In Sunday's Week in Review in the New York Times, Paul Greenberg, author of "Four Fish: The Future of the......read more

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