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Rooting Around

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Versatile root veggies are a great way to eat local and seasonal in the winter

Believe it or not, there was a time not too long ago when the only root vegetables anyone ate were carrots and potatoes. Thankfully, as Mark Bittman points out at NYT Mag, that's changed, "in part because it was all wrong; in part because if you’re going to eat seasonal and local, you are going to eat roots in winter, even if you live in California; and in part because roasted root......read more

Overdue Love for Underrated Fennel

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From City Kitchen, a versatile baked fennel dish that delights and surprises

There was a time not so long ago that fennel was scarcely available except in specialty markets. Today, you can find it in the produce section of most supermarkets, right alongside the carrots and celery. With a vague flavor of black licorice, the elegant and curvacious bulb has plenty of uses in the kitchen.  Even so, fennel is still underappreciated in North America, especially compared......read more

Better To Go Raw: 8 Vegetables It's Better To Eat Raw

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You'll get the most out of these cancer-fighting cruciferous veggies if you don't cook them

Cooking vegetables is usually a good idea: Heat breaks down cell walls, releasing antioxidants. But heating cruciferous vegetables (part of the Brassicae family) actually destroys their unique anti-carcinogenic potential. That’s because crucifers, unlike other types of vegetables, are high in glucosinolate, a plant compound that produces naturally occurring small molecules called......read more

Breeding the Nutrition Out of Our Food

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Writer Jo Robinson discusses the staggering trend of nutrient loss in fruits and vegetables

The sugary, "supersweet" corn we enjoy in summer bears little resemblance to its wild ancestor--a grassy plant called teosinte. With short spikes of grain instead of ears, teosinte has only 5 to 12 kernels in each spike and the kernels are encased in hard shells. High in starch, low in sugar, teosinte has 10 times more protein than the corn we eat today. The case of corn illustrates a much......read more

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